When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!

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Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; rabbit; strange rabbit; pet; animal; a pet is for life; garden; rabbit in garden; at home; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020

Hey everyone.

It’s April!

How are you doing?

Nope. Don’t answer that!

Nevertheless, I hope you’re all well?

It’s been a while since I wrote you on this here blog, but I’ve been working at home and using my spare time in our organic garden.

I love gardening, so I’m obsessed with growing as much food as we can.

I’m obsessed with gardening, but I was all aches & pains!
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Organic manure from our garden in Berlin
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Germany – August 2020
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Daffodils from our garden in Berlin
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Germany – August 2020
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Beetroot & Cucumber seedlings for our organic garden in Berlin
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Germany – August 2020

Meanwhile, as far as The British Berliner is concerned, I’m always in the various British-German forums on Facebook and literally all over Twitter – my favourite social media platform — so if you haven’t been to Twitter for a while do so now.

When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!

And while you’re at it.

Follow me or Like ALL of my tweets.

Go on then.

I’m waiting.

Thanks!

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A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!
©Samuel Rodriguez – United Nations Global Call Out To Creatives

My last post was on a coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners.

If you’re absolutely against the coronavirus vaccine, don’t read it!

However, if you live in Berlin and would like more information about how to get vaccinated, here’s what to do and a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ) – Click here!

So obviously, this is a fun post but if you think I’m joking.

I’m really not!

This actually happened.

Last summer!

I know. Right!

So here’s the story …

When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No! – Part 1
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020

So sometime in August, I was minding my own business and merely looking through the garden window as you do, when I saw what I thought to be a dog.

A small dog sprinting across our lawn.

A dog!

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; rabbit; strange rabbit; pet; animal; a pet is for life; garden; rabbit in garden; at home; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
You can see how I thought the rabbit was a fluffy Pomeranian dog!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020
Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; rabbit; strange rabbit; pet; animal; a pet is for life; garden; rabbit in garden; at home; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
You can see how I thought the rabbit was a fluffy Pomeranian dog. Eek!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020

Well, that’s wrong ‘cos even though we love dogs, my husband doesn’t!

So we don’t have dogs at home.

What we do have, are cats.

Two of ’em!

So a dog running across our lawn isn’t an option.

On closer inspection, I found out that it wasn’t a dog.

It was in fact, a cute fluffy rabbit!

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; rabbit; strange rabbit; pet; animal; a pet is for life; garden; rabbit in garden; at home; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020

A rabbit I tell you.

In our garden!

In Berlin!

Now what would a rabbit be doing on our lawn?

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; rabbit; strange rabbit; pet; animal; a pet is for life; garden; rabbit in garden; at home; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
This rabbit decided to make itself at home & munch on our vegetables!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020

Making itself at home, munching on our vegetable garden apparently, that’s what!

Well, we can’t have that ‘cos

Remember what I said earlier.

We have cats!

Cats that would delight in “playing” with a very small rabbit!

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; in Berlin; at home; cat; cats; pet; animal; a pet is for life; garden; cats in garden; at home; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
Victoria at home in Berlin, with both of her beautiful cats!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020
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The Tall Young Gentleman at home in Berlin, with one of our cats!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020

I first saw it about 8:30 in the morning and it seemed to disappear thereafter.

But no.

At about 7:30 in the evening, it came back again!

We weren’t really sure what to do as we didn’t want a blood bath on our hands.

Or even worse.

A fox lurking through the garden!

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I might live in a leafy suburb, but Berlin has foxes!

Yep.

I might live in Germany’s capital city, but our leafy suburb of Prenzlauerberg / Pankow, has foxes!

We called the local Animal Shelter who told us to keep an eye on it, and if we still saw it by the weekend, we should call again!

We were extremely worried and concerned that “something might happen,” so we alerted our neighbours.

When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No! – Part 2
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020

We put notices up on Facebook, Twitter, and all my social media channels, looking for the owner of a lost rabbit!

We even put a poster in the local neighbourhood newspaper, but to no avail.

There was no response.

Nothing.

Nada.

Was there no child in tears and anguish, longing for their missing pet?

Apparently not!

And worse, because of the pandemic, the Berlin Animal Shelter couldn’t in fact, take the rabbit, neither could the local farmyard in Prenzlauerberg!

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; Frank Böster; The Music Producer; rabbit; strange rabbit; pet; animal; a pet is for life; garden; rabbit in garden; at home; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
My husband – The Music Producer – getting used to the rabbit that was in and out of our garden, for weeks!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – August 2020

Oh dear.

So what happened next?

Well, that rabbit was in and out of our garden for almost four weeks!

Until at last, somebody came to claim it.

A person that lived just three gardens down!

And how come they hadn’t seen all our anguish requests of ownership?

Why indeed?

‘Cos they’d been on holiday!

?!#*?!!

Anyhoo, the rabbit went back to its rightful owner, and we could finally “relax” knowing that our cats could roam freely.

And even though we’re in the middle of a global pandemic.

Life was good.

Phew!

p.s If you’re booking hotels, houses and apartments, use this link to save 15% or more, between 1st April and 30th September!

Booking.com

When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; in Berlin; at home; cat; cats; pet; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
Victoria at home in Berlin, with one of her cats!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – May 2020

That’s it for now.

Thank you so much everyone. I really appreciate it lots.

Thank you for making this blog real, reading, commenting, and connecting. You’re all amazing.

All content will continue to remain free of charge but if you feel like buying me a cup of tea, I will graciously accept!

Cheers!

Buy Me A Cup of Tea!

Make A Donation Donate so that I can continue to write hilarious stories and create amazing content! Thanks so much!

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Here’s the link again: http://wordpress.com/refer-a-friend/qyyjJjnfWBnRGPVRj0V

Once again if you can, stay at home.

Better to be safe than sorry.

Don’t forget, please SHARE this post!

I really appreciate it.

When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!

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When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!

If you want to keep up with reliable news on what’s going on around the world, you can follow me here.

Don’t forget.

Click here!

And book your luxury hotel for 2021 right here!

Don’t judge me!

WHEN A STRANGE RABBIT CAME TO LIVE IN OUR GARDEN – GOODNESS ME. NO!

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When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!

This article is not sponsored.

It’s April!

Yay!

Watch this space!

DISCLOSURE!

Please note that The British Berliner is a participant in affiliate programmes designed to provide a means for sites to earn fees by advertising and linking to World Nomads Travel Insurance & Booking.com.

In short, there are two affiliate link companies connected to this post!

Every time one of these services is used, booked, and paid for via my link, I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

So what are you waiting for?

Thanks a million!

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; rabbit; strange rabbit; pet; animal; a pet is for life; garden; rabbit in garden; at home; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
When a strange rabbit came to live in our garden – goodness me. No!

Have you ever had a strange encounter? Do you like rabbits? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions, send me a Tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on LinkedIn, make a comment below or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or Like it!

A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!

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A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!
©Samuel Rodriguez – United Nations Global Call Out To Creatives

I’m sure that you’re all aware that a Covid-19 vaccine is now available for all and sundry.

As of February 4th, 2021, 2,848,022 people in Germany have been vaccinated.

That’s great news!

Isn’t it?

Yes!

But more still needs to be done.

There’s a lot of conflicting information out there as to what is the vaccine, who is eligible, how will the vaccine be allocated, and when.

DISCLAIMER!

Before we go any further, let me make it clear that I am not a health specialist, so if you need medical advice, please contact your doctor!

I assume no liability for the accuracy of the enclosed data.

Right, now that’s out of the way, let’s plod on.

Coronavirus vaccination underway in Germany

Obviously, most people are anxious and concerned about the safety, efficiency, and distribution of the coronavirus vaccine.

If you’re absolutely against the coronavirus vaccine, look away now!

If you live in Berlin and would like more information about how to get vaccinated, here’s a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ).

I will add the links and webpages of the various organisations or offices at the bottom of this article.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)!

Questions? Don’t worry, I’ve got all day!
Why should I be vaccinated against Covid-19? / Can’t we just wait & see?

Sure!

However, you might want to think things through a little more.

There are groups of people who WILL become seriously ill after becoming infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, myself included!

The risk of becoming seriously ill or of dying after contracting Covid-19 is many times greater than with the flu. Older people or those with pre-existing illnesses, have a greater risk of becoming seriously ill.

As such, the new coronavirus vaccine offers the best-possible protection against infection and potential consequences.

Only when approximately 70 percent of the population are immune, will transmission of SARS-CoV-2 be reduced to the extent that the pandemic will disappear.

Do I have to be vaccinated?

No.

Vaccination against Covid-19 is not mandatory in Germany, but it is highly recommended.

If you are vaccinated, you not only protect yourself, but others too.

How can I be vaccinated?

In principle, only people who have received an invitation, can be vaccinated in Berlin.

You cannot apply for vaccination by yourself. You will either receive a letter of invitation or a request to contact your GP or family doctor.

You need to be registered as officially residing in Berlin – angemeldet – in order to receive an invitation.

People with a high job-related risk of becoming infected, might also be invited to vaccination through their employer.

You don’t need a certificate / document or an attestation.

Your personal ID or passport will suffice.

Why can’t I be vaccinated at my doctor’s surgery?

The vaccine will not be available at doctors’ surgeries in the first few months weeks of the vaccination programme. This is a temporary situation.

Due to logistics, some vaccines have to be kept at extremely low temperatures, are supplied in multi-dose containers, and must be properly stored.

In addition, it is easier to organise vaccinations if the people who are to be protected as members of priority groups, are vaccinated first.

The more people vaccinated at an early stage, the sooner the pandemic can be brought under control.

Where can I be vaccinated?

Covid-19 vaccinations will initially be administered at vaccination centres.

Mobile teams will also be deployed, for example, to administer vaccines in residential care homes.

At a later date, vaccinations will also be available at doctor’s surgeries.

Will the vaccine be injected at a temperature of -70°C?

No.

Although the vaccine is stored at around -70°C, shortly before vaccination it is thawed and mixed into a saline solution, which is stored at normal refrigerator or room temperature.

How often must I be vaccinated?

To ensure complete protection, you will need to be vaccinated twice (two times), at intervals of between three or four weeks.

Why are others being vaccinated first?

At the initial stage, there will not be enough vaccine available for all.

It is recommended that those who have the greatest health-related risk of developing a serious case of Covid-19 and those with a job-related risk of becoming infected, are vaccinated first.

The ultimate goal is to vaccinate everyone who wants to be vaccinated against coronavirus, as soon as possible.

Who gets vaccinated first?

Because the vaccine is only available in limited quantities to begin with, people with an especially high risk of developing a serious or fatal case of Covid-19 will be vaccinated first.

It is planned that all people to be vaccinated as a matter of priority will be notified personally, or via the press.

If you provide care for people entitled to be vaccinated, such as the elderly in residential nursing homes, who cannot give their consent to vaccination themselves, it is best for you as a carer, to hand in a written request to the home management, in advance.

People with a particularly high job-related risk of infection or who have close contact with vulnerable groups of people, should also be able to be vaccinated first. This means:

  • Residents of senior citizens’ homes or residential nursing homes
  • Nursing staff in both outpatient and inpatient geriatric care
  • Other staff in senior citizens’ homes or residential nursing homes who have contact with residents
  • People aged 80 and over
  • Staff in medical institutions
    • with an especially high risk of becoming infected
      (e.g. in emergency rooms, in providing medical care for Covid-19 patients)
    • with close contact to vulnerable groups (e.g. in oncology or transplant medicine)
How safe are the new vaccines?

Several tens of thousands of people were involved in the vaccine trials. No serious side-effects have been reported so far.

Possible frequently-occurring side-effects include slight-to-moderate pain at the injection site, fatigue and headaches, all of which are temporary and usually disappear within two days.

In the approval trials, side-effects can be observed with a frequency of 1 in 1,000. No conclusions can be drawn at this stage regarding any long-term effects.

While certain risks cannot be ruled out, Germany insists that only vaccines that meet very strict safety standards and have undergone extensive clinical trials, are approved.

The safety tests were optimised for the coronavirus vaccine in that the traditional test phases were carried out in parallel, and not staggered at intervals over time. But that does not mean that test phases were left out.

The main priority is safety first.

Where can I report side-effects?

If you notice any side-effects, you must contact your local doctor or pharmacist, straight away.

Even if they did not administer the vaccination, they are your first point of contact in evaluating side-effects, making a possible diagnosis, and prescribing follow-up treatment.

Suspected cases of side-effects are taken very seriously and efforts are made to clarify as quickly as possible, whether the symptoms involve a co-incidental reaction, or are a real side-effect.

In many cases, suspected side-effect have not been confirmed.

Side-effects can also be reported to the Paul Ehrlich Institute via the nebenwirkungen.bund.de website or via the Paul Ehrlich Institute app SafeVac 2.0 App:

For Google, click here!

For Apple, click here!

NOTE: Your doctor will, and is required, to report any side-effects that occur to the respective authorities.

Is it true that the vaccine contains microchips?

Such an assumption is a conspiracy theory, not fact.

The microchip claim is false.

Research on the Covid-19 vaccine is conducted by scientists.

Their aim is to develop a safe coronavirus vaccine.

I’m scared that the vaccine is dangerous.

Your mental health is important.

Speak to your doctor. They are the best people to answer all your questions about the coronavirus vaccine.

With the coronavirus vaccine, there is hope of providing safe and effective protection against Covid-19 infection.

Prior to approval, the vaccines had been tested in clinical trials involving several tens of thousands of volunteers.

No serious side-effects have occurred so far.

No conclusions can be drawn at this stage regarding any long-term effects.

The risk of harm from contracting the infection is far greater.

How was it possible for the vaccine to be developed so quickly?

Researchers already knew a lot about SARS-CoV-2, from similar viruses.

That knowledge could be quickly used, and provided a good basis on which to develop the Covid-19 vaccine.

Researchers around the world had been working on vaccine development simultaneously, sharing their latest results with each other, and passing them on to the testing and approval authorities.

This kind of global scientific collaboration has not been seen prior to this pandemic.

However, there’s no cause for concern.

None of the test phases were left out.

Several test phases were worked on in parallel, and cooperation was extremely intensive
throughout.

Can the new vaccines influence or manipulate our genes?

You’re referring to mRNA vaccines.

These are not converted into DNA and have no influence on our genes.

DNA cannot be made from mRNA in human cells. While DNA and mRNA sound similar, they are two entirely different things.

When you receive an mRNA vaccine, your body responds by making proteins which your immune system responds to by making antibodies, which then protect you against the actual virus.

Are side-effects to be expected from the mRNA vaccine?

Vaccine reactions are not the same as side-effects.

Based on the results of pre-approval clinical studies that showed good tolerability, the incidence of side-effects is low.

However, as with every vaccination, vaccine reactions can occur.

They are actually a good sign that your body is absorbing the vaccine and is building antibodies.

Vaccine reactions can include things like medium-severity headaches, pain in the limbs and joints, pain in the arm near the injection site, tiredness or flu-like symptoms.

Monitor your symptoms and if you have any questions, contact your doctor as described in the answer to „Where can I report side-effects?” above.

Can children be vaccinated?

No.

The vaccines will only be available for adults.

The vaccine has not yet been sufficiently tested in children and adolescents. It cannot, therefore, be recommended for general use among younger age groups.

If a vaccine for children is developed in the near future, the regulatory authorities must then ensure that it is effective and safe, just as for the vaccines for adults.

When the time comes, vaccination recommendations will also be made for children.

I’ve been vaccinated, can I stop social distancing and using a mouth-nose covering?

Don’t be a prat!

The vaccine takes effect and provides protection approximately 3-4 weeks after the second vaccination, but even after that you will still need to comply with the prevailing hygiene and distancing rules.

Despite immunity, you may still be a carrier – so the rules continue to apply for the time being, for everyone’s protection.

Do I still need to be tested for Covid-19 before being vaccinated?

No.

If you have no symptoms, it won’t be necessary.

The tolerability of the vaccine is not negatively influenced by an acute infection.

Can I be vaccinated if I’ve already had Covid19?

It is generally assumed that people are immune after contracting Covid-19.

If you have already had a coronavirus infection, you do not need to be vaccinated. However, vaccination is not harmful if the infection has passed unnoticed.

What does “vaccination has 95 percent efficacy against Covid-19”, mean?

According to manufacturers’ instructions, the Covid-19 vaccines offer a high degree of protection of up to 95 percent.

Studies show that in trials, Covid-19 vaccinated volunteers were 95 percent less likely to contract coronavirus than those vaccinated with the placebo. If a Covid-19 vaccinated person comes into contact with the pathogen, it is highly unlikely that they will become infected.

How much does vaccination cost?

In Germany, vaccination is free of charge.

The cost of the vaccine will be borne by your health insurance and / or the Federal Government.

Where can I get vaccinated?

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Covid-19 Coronavirus Vaccine
A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!
How many vaccination centres are there in Berlin?

There are six vaccination centres in Berlin:

Messe Berlin (Hall 21) – Corona-Impfzentrum – BioNTech Vaccine

Erika-Hess-Ice rink (Eisstadion) – Corona-Impfzentrum – Moderna Vaccine

Velodrom – Corona-Impfzentrum – Moderna Vaccine

Arena Berlin – Corona-Impfzentrum – BioNTech Vaccine

Former Tegel Airport (Flughafen Tegel) – Terminal C

Former Tempelhof Airport

Can I choose a vaccination centre, or will a specific vaccination centre be assigned to me?

You are free to choose any of the 6 Berlin vaccination centres.

Is my vaccination centre accessible for disabled people?

Every vaccination centre is at least barrier-free.

For more information, click here.

Can I take my guide dog with me?

Yes.

Your guide dog can also accompany you to the vaccination centre however, during vaccination itself, your dog must wait in front of the vaccination cabin.

Can I have someone with me during the vaccination?

No!

Please arrange your arrival so that any accompanying person can wait OUTSIDE the building.

Support is available at the vaccination centre, if you need it.

Only in exceptional situations (e.B. legal supervisor) is an accompanying person allowed into the building.

Can I speak English at the vaccination centre?

There are plans to have contact staff for languages in German, English, Turkish and French.

Educational materials will also be provided in different languages.

It is possible to use telephone voice intermediary services on site.

Are drinks onsite?

Yes.

Water is available AFTER vaccination.

Does the second vaccination have to take place in the same centre as the initial vaccination?

Yes.

How do I book a vaccination appointment?

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; International Certificate of Vaccination; Certificate of Vaccination; Vaccination Certificate; yellow certificate; yellow book; yellow card; yellow vaccination book; vaccination book; vaccination card; vaccine certificate; vaccination passport; Corona; Coronavirus; Corona Virus; Zusammen Gegen Corona; coronavirus vaccination; coronavirus vaccine; coronavirus vaccine guide; COVID-19, COVID19; vaccination; vaccine; vaccine guide; coronavirus vaccination guide; coronavirus vaccination guide for Berlin Expats; coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners; coronavirus vaccine guide for Berlin Expats; coronavirus vaccine guide for Expat Berliners; virus; virus infection; global pandemic; global infection; global virus; Berlin Expat; Berlin guide; expat; Expat Berlin; expat life; expat guide; expat tips; British expat; British expat in Berlin; This is my Berlin; Berlin; Germany; travel;
Victoria’s yellow International Certificate of Vaccination book!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – February 2021

Don’t panic!

If you live in Berlin, you don’t have to do a single thing.

When it’s your time to get the vaccine, you will get an invitation letter – Einladungsschreiben – from the Senate Department of Health – Senatsverwaltung für Gesundheit.

In the invitation letter, you will find a code – Imfpcode – this code will allow you to book an appointment at a vaccination centre.

If you are not officially registered as living in Berlin, you might not get an invitation.

If you haven’t done the Anmeldung, do so now.

What do I need to bring to the vaccination centre?

To get vaccinated, you must bring:

  • Your identity card, passport or residence permit
  • The letter of invitation for vaccination – Einladungsschreiben
  • The medical history questionnaire attached to the letter of invitation – completed and filled in – Anamnesebogen
  • The declaration of consent attached to the letter of invitation – signed – Einverständniserklärung
My documents are incomplete – can I still be vaccinated?

Try to bring all documents with you.

If you have forgotten the information sheet, the declaration of consent sheet, or the medical history questionnaire, you can do them onsite.

You MUST however, have your identity card / passport, and invitation letter with you.

Without them, you will not be vaccinated.

Do I need to bring my yellow international certificate of vaccination book?

For organisational reasons, you will receive a separate proof of vaccination.

You can include evidence of the coronavirus vaccination for the yellow book later on, with your local doctor.

I’ve lost / I can’t find / I don’t have a yellow international certificate of vaccination book – can I still be vaccinated?

Yes.

You can still be vaccinated.

You will receive documentation of the coronavirus vaccination on a separate sheet.

You can register the vaccination in your yellow international certificate of vaccination book later on, with your local doctor.

I lost the insert in my vaccination passport, can I still get the second vaccination?

Yes.

You can still get your second vaccination.

The two vaccinations are documented in the vaccination center where you received your first dose.

What can I expect at the vaccination centre?

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Coronavirus Vaccine – Covid-19
A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!

If you receive an invitation, you can go to any of the 6 vaccination centres.

The appointment should take no longer than 60 to 90 minutes!

Invitation Check and Registration

When checking in, please register and have your vaccination entitlement checked.

Waiting and Information

While in the waiting area, you can watch an informational film about what to expect before seeing a doctor, who will give you more details about the vaccination process.

Medical Consultation

You will also receive an information sheet and a consent form.

Please read both documents carefully.

Next, you will have the opportunity to speak to a doctor, and receive advice about health-related issues concerning coronavirus vaccination.

You can also ask any questions you may have.

At the end of the consultation, please sign both the information sheet and the consent form.

You will receive a signed copy of each to take home.

Information Sheet

The information sheet provides answers to the most important questions concerning coronavirus vaccination such as:

What exactly is Covid-19, what are the typical symptoms, and why is it so dangerous?

How does the vaccine work, how does it behave once in the body, and how effective is it?

What do I need to consider before, and after vaccination?

What vaccine reactions and side-effects could occur?

Consent Form

You fill in the form to provide information about your state of health, previous vaccinations, and any allergies you may have.

The doctor administering the vaccination may also ask questions in response to the information you provide.

By signing the form, you expressly consent to receiving a coronavirus vaccination.

Vaccination

The coronavirus vaccinations are administered by specially trained healthcare staff.

The vaccination will be documented in your vaccination passport – Impfpass – noting the batch number, and various other information.

If you don’t have a vaccination passport, you will receive a substitute confirmation letter.

Post-Vaccination Observation

Once you have been vaccinated, you will be shown to a separate waiting area where you will remain under medical observation, for a short period of time.

To participate in the survey on Covid-19 vaccine tolerability, use the Paul Ehrlich Institute’s SafeVac 2.0-App app (available from the Apple App Store or from Google Play).

You can report any side-effects you may have via the app.

You should also report any side-effects to your doctor, who will examine your symptoms and conduct any further tests.

Side-effects can also be reported via the Paul Ehrlich Institute website, to your local pharmacist or the vaccine manufacturer, who will then report symptoms that could be related to the vaccine, to the central authorities.

Check-Out and Second Vaccination Appointment

You have now received your first dose of coronavirus vaccine.

In order to be fully inoculated, you MUST get the second dose, 3 to 4 weeks after the first vaccination!

You MUST get your second vaccine in the same location as the first.

Please take your vaccination passport – Impfpass – or the substitute confirmation letter, with you to the second appointment.

And at all times, please ensure that you follow the coronavirus hygiene rules – keep your distance from others, wash or disinfect your hands, and cover your mouth and nose.

Here comes the science!

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Here comes the science!
A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!
I have a fever or a cold, should I still turn up?

Please consult with your doctor for advice BEFORE the vaccination date.

What side effects are expected after vaccination?

Typical complaints are redness, swelling and pain at the vaccination site.

Fever, headache, limb pain and discomfort, are also possible.

These reactions are an expression of the desired confrontation of the immune system with the vaccine, and usually disappear completely after a few days.

Specific side effects: No serious safety concerns have been identified so far, but the observation period for relevant vaccine side effects is still too short.

When can I expect side effects, if at all?

Possible side effects are expected shortly after vaccination.

Am I allowed to do sport, physical exertion, drive, … after vaccination?

Physical exertion and hot baths should be avoided immediately after vaccination.

Driving is allowed.

Is it possible to get Covid-19 despite the vaccination?

Yes.

The vaccine offers a very high level of protection, but 100% protection cannot be guaranteed.

How is the vaccine administered?

The vaccine is injected by a medical person.

What amount of vaccine is given?

In the first vaccines, approximately 0.3 – 0.5 ml are administered per vaccination.

How soon can I expect vaccination protection?

The BioNTech vaccine has more than 90% protection against Covid-19 seven (7) days after the second vaccination.

Information on the other vaccines will follow.

How long does vaccination last?

We don’t yet know as there are no long-term observations.

I think I might have Covid-19. What should I do?

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If you think you might have coronavirus, contact your doctor
©Russell Tate – United Nations Global Call Out To Creatives

If you think you might have the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, you should contact your doctor, seek clarification, or get a test. The Senate Department of Health has set up a hotline.

You can call the hotline number 030 90 28 28 28 every day from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

You can call the Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians. The number is 116117.

If you’re not sure where your health authority is, use this digital tool to find out! Click here.

If you prefer not to talk on the phone, there is Bobbi – the Berlin chatbot – who will answer your questions about SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, in various languages. Click here.

Anything Else?

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; snowman; woman; woman with snowman; snow; winter vibes; winter; weather; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; in Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg; Prenzlauerberg; Prenzlauer Berg Berlin; Berlin Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; Europe; travel; Europe;
Victoria having fun with Mr. Snowman in Prenzlauerberg!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – February 2021

After vaccination, you will receive a Vaccination Certificate or Impfausweis.

Will Victoria get vaccinated?

Probably!

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Victoria with a FFP2 face mask in the garden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – February 2021

Government Sources!

For more information of official or government websites, click here!
  • the Governing Mayor of Berlin – Senate Chancellery Corona virus information (Covid-19) – English
  • Der Regierende Bürgermeister von Berlin – Senatskanzlei Informationen zum Coronavirus (Covid-19) – German
  • the Press and Information Office of the Federal Government – Engish
  • Presse- und Informationsamt der Bundesregierung – German
  • the Federal Ministry of Health – a little bit of English
  • Bundesministerium für Gesundheit – German
  • the Berliner Krankenhausgesellschaft e.V. – German
  • the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin – English
  • Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin – German
  • the Robert Koch Institute – English
  • Robert Koch-Institut – German
  • the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute – Federal Institute for Vaccines and Biomedicines – English
  • Paul-Ehrlich-Institut – Bundesinstitut für Impfstoffe und biomedizinische Arznemittel – German
  • Information on COVID-19 in Germany – Zusammen gegen Corona – English
  • Information on COVID-19 in Germany – Zusammen gegen Corona – German
  • Informationen der Bundesländer zur Corona-Impfung – German
  • Impfung gegen Corona (SARS-CoV-2) in Berlin – German
  • Impfdashboard – Bundesministerium für Gesundheit – German
  • Federal Office for Health Education: Information on COVID-19 in several languages!

Downloads!

p.s. If you’re booking hotels, houses and apartments, use this link to save 20% or more, between 5th January and 31st March 2021!

Booking.com

A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; in Berlin; at home; cat; cats; pet; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
Victoria at home in Berlin, with one of her cats!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – May 2020

Thank you for making this blog real, reading, commenting, and connecting. You’re all amazing.

All content will continue to remain free of charge but if you feel like buying me a cup of tea, I will graciously accept!

Buy Me A Cup of Tea!

Make A Donation Donate so that I can continue to write hilarious stories and create amazing content! Thanks so much!

€1.00

Thanks very much.

Cheers!

Don’t forget, please SHARE this post!

A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!

If you want to keep up with reliable news on what’s going on around the world, you can follow me here.

Don’t forget.

Click here!

And book your luxury hotel for 2021 right here!

Don’t judge me!

A CORONAVIRUS VACCINATION GUIDE FOR EXPAT BERLINERS!

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Prescription: Stay at Home!
©Nick van Wagenberg – United Nations Global Call Out To Creatives

This article is not sponsored, and all thoughts and opinions, are my very own!

A huge thanks goes to all the many doctors, nurses, healthcare staff, keyworkers, and volunteers world-wide, who have and are still, putting their lives on the line in order to help others.

Please stay at home, keep your distance from others, wear your FFP2 mask, and wash your hands!

Better to be safe than sorry.

See you soon!

Watch this space!

DISCLOSURE!

Please note that The British Berliner is a participant in affiliate programmes designed to provide a means for sites to earn fees by advertising and linking to World Nomads Travel Insurance & Booking.com.

In short, there are two affiliate link companies connected to this post!

Every time one of these services is used, booked, and paid for via my link, I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

So what are you waiting for?

Thanks a million!

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A coronavirus vaccination guide for Expat Berliners!

Are you going to take the coronavirus vaccine? Why? / Why not?

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions, send me a Tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on LinkedIn, make a comment below or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or Like it!

Goodbye 2020. Hello 2021!

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Bring on 2021!
Goodbye 2020. Hello 2021!

Happy New Year everyone!

It’s official.

It’s 2021!

At last!

Gosh!

What.

A.

Year!

I wanted to write about so many things in December 2020, but it was my birthday month.

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; birthday; happy birthday; it's my birthday; presents; birthday presents; pressies; prezzies; celebrate; celebration; made it; I made it; This is my Berlin; in Berlin; Prenzlauerberg; Berlin; Germany; Europe;
Happy Birthday to me! Presents? Whoopee!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – December 2020
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Happy Birthday to me! Victoria in her non-wintry garden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – December 2020

And so I picked December to “use up” the rest of my “holiday/vacation time.”

Who could have predicted that 2020 would go belly up?

I certainly didn’t!

How I can afford a life of travel. Don't choose. Live a life of style in 2020; tea; drinking tea; a cup of tea; teapot; tea drinking; drinking; travel blogging; travel blogger; British expat; British in Berlin; British in Germany; Europe; travel; family travel;
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If only we knew.

Aaaaaaaaaaaaah!

What the hell!

As I work for an Engineering / Information Technology company, I embarked on some self-learning in order to update my IT repertoire!

As well as other bits n’ pieces, but more on that later in the year …

Luckily, for me, my company gives me the opportunity to use Skillsoft Percipio.

For free!

In your own time of course, but isn’t that fantastic?

And as a 2021 present to you, I found a link to a 14-day trial/free access (there’s no affiliation or partnership). Here’s the Skillsoft Percipio link!

If you’re in Germany, scroll to the bottom of that page link and change the language. If that doesn’t work, try this link!

Update your skills in 2021!

I did lots of reading.

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The benefits of a staycation – Read the book that’s been languishing on your bedside table for months!

I’m an avid bookworm and I Iove to read because …

There is a splinter of ice in the heart of a writer – Graham Greene

A splinter of ice

Oops!

I read both physical books and eBooks. Here’s how to do so for free, or very little money!

Free books. Yay!

I also lavishly wasted my time and watched trailers of films and programmes that quite frankly, I had already seen!

I know.

It doesn’t make any sense at all, but what does?

Top 50 Greatest Trailers of All Time!

I had planned to write blog posts about winter and the skiing holidays that I been on in 2019 and the EARLY part of 2020 pre-pandemic, and then this happened.

Twats!

And this.

OMG!

So I thought it best not to write abut my love of skiing, in case someone got the wrong idea …

And because, we’re in the middle of a global pandemic, I’m devastated over Brexit, and I simply didn’t feel like it.

For the first time since this blog started, I didn’t write anything in December at all!

Here’s why.

You’ll love it!

From the creators of Black Mirror, here’s Death to 2020.

It makes you feel sad, even a little weepy, but somehow you’ll love it!

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The British Berliner is 7 years old. And so much has happened!

2020 was a very mixed year!

A very mixed year indeed, but thank you so much for reading, making comment, and sticking with me.

I love you all!

p.s If you’re booking hotels, houses and apartments, use this link to save 20% or more, between 5th January and 31st March 2021!

Booking.com

Goodbye 2020. Hello 2021!

Victoria Ade-Genschow; The British Berliner; in Berlin; at home; cat; cats; pet; Berlin; Germany; travel; Europe;
Victoria at home in Berlin, with one of her cats!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – May 2020

Thank you so much everyone. I really appreciate it lots.

Thank you for making this blog real, reading, commenting, and connecting. You’re all amazing.

All content will continue to remain free of charge but if you feel like buying me a cup of tea, I will graciously accept!

Cheers!

Buy Me A Cup of Tea!

Make A Donation Donate so that I can continue to write hilarious stories and create amazing content! Thanks so much!

€1.00

If you want to write your own blog, here’s my link to a $25 or €25 discount in credit with any paid plan with WordPress. Don’t say that I don’t give you anything!

Here’s the link again: http://wordpress.com/refer-a-friend/qyyjJjnfWBnRGPVRj0V

Once again if you can, stay at home.

Better to be safe than sorry.

Don’t forget, please SHARE this post!

I really appreciate it.

Goodbye 2020. Hello 2021!

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We won’t miss you 2020!
Goodbye 2020. Hello 2021!

If you want to keep up with reliable news on what’s going on around the world, you can follow me here.

Don’t forget.

Click here!

And book your luxury hotel for 2021 right here!

Don’t judge me!

GOODBYE 2020. HELLO 2021!

goodbye 2020; hello 2021; New Year; 2021; goodbye; hello; live today; motivation; inspiration; old things; new things;
Goodbye 2020. Hello 2021!

This article is not sponsored.

It’s a New Year in 2021!

Yay!

Watch this space!

DISCLOSURE!

Please note that The British Berliner is a participant in affiliate programmes designed to provide a means for sites to earn fees by advertising and linking to World Nomads Travel Insurance & Booking.com.

In short, there are two affiliate link companies connected to this post!

Every time one of these services is used, booked, and paid for via my link, I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

So what are you waiting for?

Thanks a million!

Goodbye 2020. Hello 2021; Goodbye 2020; Hello 2021; New Year; 2021; goodbye; hello; live today; motivation; inspiration; old things; new things;
Goodbye 2020. Hello 2021!

What was the worst part of 2020? Are you ready for 2021? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions, send me a Tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on LinkedIn, make a comment below or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or Like it!

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